On a Good Day is changing

On a Good Day is coming to end. Well, its first phase in at least. When I started this blog, it was intended to be a personal blog about being a dad, a way of preserving of my thoughts and memories of fatherhood. But I love music as well, and so I thought, why not make it a blog about both fatherhood and music.

Problem was, I never really able to crowbar those two subjects together in a way that really worked. I was also constantly torn between blogging just as a hobby, and trying to make the blog ‘successful’ (whatever that means – lots of readers I guess). Eventually I came to realise that trying to make it successful was taking all the enjoyment out of it for me, and that at this point in my life I didn’t have the time or inclination for blogging as anything other than a hobby. I’ve learnt a lot over the last few years though, and now have dozens of others ideas for blogs and websites, some of which may even come to fruition in future years.

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Bjork – Unravel

For my 500th track of the day, one of my favourite tracks of all time, Unravel by Bjork.

Once you’ve been interested in music for any length of time, you soon come to the conclusion that there are no new love songs. If there’s one subject that his been endlessly dissected, described in every single way, it’s love. But Bjork is unlikely any other artist, endlessly innovative, constitutionally incapable of cliche, and Unravel is unlike any love song I’ve heard.

Musically, Unravel lays a gentle bed of organ washes, saxophone and the softest, most distant electronics. Subtly beautiful in their way, but really all about giving space to the vocal, and the lyrics. And what beautiful lyrics they are. Bjork conjures the ingenious metaphor of love as a ball of yarn, slowly unravelling as the couple are apart and having to be put back together each time they return to each other.

Bjork’s vocal performance is masterful also, more restrained than on some of her other songs, yet still conveying every atom of emotion it is possible for the song to convey. It’s those lyrics though that get me every time, one of those rare songs that continues to stir my heart no matter how many times I hear it. When I am away from my wife and family I think of this song often, and my heart does unravel like that ball of yarn.

The first 483 tracks of the day can only be found on my Tumblr. Everything since can be found here. There’s also a Spotify playlist of every single track of the day (or those available on Spotify at least) below:

Tracks of the Year 2016

Last week I gave you my albums of the year, today the ten songs that gave me most pleasure in 2016.

10: Frankie Cosmos – Sappho

Any number of tracks from Frankie Cosmos’s excellent album ‘Next Thing’ could have made the cut, but Sappho encapsulated her melodic, lo-fi indie perfectly.

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Albums of the Year 2016

2016 may not have been a great year (well let’s be honest, it was absolutely terrible), but there were plenty of great albums released. My ten favourites are listed below, but I’d also like to give shout outs to David Bowie, Cate Le Bon, Colin Stetson, Cross Record, PJ Harvey, Radiohead, Anna Meredith, The Julie Ruin, Frankie Cosmos, Factory Floor, Mitski, Xam Duo, Diiv & Danny Brown who all released wonderful records this year but didn’t quite make the list

10. Lisa Hannigan – At Swim

Lisa Hannigan’s first two albums were also excellent, but At Swim represents a new artistic peak for the Irish singer-songwriter. Her voice is as gorgeous as ever, but there is a new subtlety and depth to her songwriting, with songs managing to deliver immediate melodic hits yet still reveal new pleasures on each listen. The production from The National’s Aaron Dessner is also excellent, never do the arrangements overshadow the songs themselves, but the album is not afraid to step away from a standard folky palette to incorporate sounds from other genres (as in the electronica-influenced Undertow). An excellent album from an underappreciated artist.

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Ivor Cutler – In The Chestnut Tree

Sometimes you find beauty in the most unexpected places. I was compiling a playlist of songs about wood for my wife last week (this isn’t quite as strange as it first sounds, it was our 5th wedding anniversary on Saturday, for which wood is the traditional gift. I did buy her a proper present as well), and was looking for some songs to include alongside the more obvious choices (Knock on Wood, Norweigan Wood, Feed The Tree etc.). I happened upon Ivor Cutler’s ‘In The Chestnut Tree’. I was a little familiar with his work already. He had cropped up regularly on the John Peel show, before both men passed within 18 months of each other a decade ago, and I had a song of his on a Rough Trade compilation I used to own. I knew him to be a slightly eccentric man, producing quirky little songs and poems, they were funny and unique, but I expected little from them.

In The Chestnut Tree is different though, it’s a simple thing, less than 90 seconds long, just a few lines of Cutler’s surprisingly pretty singing voice (I am a bit of a sucker for a Scottish singer, as my King Creosote review will attest), accompanied by a sparse piano, but I find it to be compelling, beautiful and deeply romantic, more so than I ever could have though possible from a track from a 40 year old spoken word album. I hope you love it too.