I wish that I lived in a simple world – Music, The Internet & Me.

A sixth form computer room in 1998, and it’s hard to imagine how excited I was to hear a low-quality 30 second clip of a song by Brazilian-American metal band Soulfly. It was the first time I had used this new-fangled internet thingy people were so excited about, and of course the first thing I wanted to use it for was to listen to music. I sat, headphones on, in awe and wonder at the idea that I could hear a bit of a song without buying the CD or waiting for it to come on the radio. Little did I know where it would lead.

Stepping back a bit, to 1993, when music began to truly matter to me, options for hearing the kind of music I loved were very limited. Evenings on Radio 1 were pretty much the only place you could hear indie or alternative music and I listened religiously to the Evening Session, John Peel and Mark & Lard. MTV existed (and was still primarily a channel that played music videos), but not in my house. You might get the occasional band or video I liked on Top of the Pops or The Chart Show (the first place I heard Nirvana incidentally), but you could hardly rely on it.

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Tracks of the year 2015

There were so many great songs to choose from in 2015, so to narrow it down to 11 I had to ask myself, which were the songs I listened to on repeat throughout the year? Even then, I was only able to narrow it down to 11 rather than the more traditional ten. So, here goes:

11. De Lux – Oh Man the Future

De Lux were our new band of the month back in September, but this was always my favourite song of theirs by far. As compelling and catchy as a paranoid rant about the future can be.

10. Leftfield and Sleaford Mods – Head and Shoulders

Sleaford Mods were perhaps the most divisive band of the year, as became apparent when a friend mentioned this track on Facebook. The split was pretty even between those who thought it was the worst thing they’d ever heard, and those who love it. I wasn’t sure at first, but grew to love it, with Leftield’s bassy electronic rumblings proving a perfect match for Sleaford Mods’ surrealist, angry ranting.

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